Beyond Binaries: What trans adults with ‘eating disorders’ need from healthcare

Beyond Binaries: What trans adults with ‘eating disorders’ need from healthcare


Seeking 3-6 individuals who identify under the trans umbrella - Trans(gender) or Gender Nonbinary


Are you over 18 years of age?


Do you identify as having had or currently identify as having an ‘eating disorder’ (diagnoses not required)?


Have accessed healthcare services related to your gender identity and ‘eating disorder’ or where the healthcare provider you were seeing was aware of your trans identity and your ‘eating disorder’?


Participation will include:

• An email to confirm eligibility

• Completion of an online 60 minute confidential survey which will ask you questions about your gender identity, ‘eating disorder’ experiences, as well as your healthcare experiences. You will also be asked about what you believe could be done by healthcare providers to improve healthcare for trans individuals who experience ‘eating disorders’.

"Toronto is in the 'Dish With One Spoon Territory’. The Dish With One Spoon is a treaty between the Anishinaabe, Mississaugas and Haudenosaunee that bound them to share the territory and protect the land. Subsequent Indigenous Nations and peoples, Europeans and all newcomers have been invited into this treaty in the spirit of peace, friendship and respect."


The "Dish", or sometimes it is called the "Bowl", represents what is now southern Ontario, from the Great Lakes to Quebec and from Lake Simcoe into the United States. *We all eat out of the Dish, all of us that share this territory, with only one spoon. That means we have to share the responsibility of ensuring the dish is never empty, which includes taking care of the land and the creatures we share it with. Importantly, there are no knives at the table, representing that we must keep the peace. The dish is graphically represented by the wampum pictured above.


This was a treaty made between the Anishinaabe and Haudenosaunee after the French and Indian War. Newcomers were then incorporated into it over the years, notably in 1764 with The Royal Proclamation/The Treaty of Niagara.